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Old 10-07-2006, 8:57 AM   #1
Atlanta Aquarium Atlanta Aquarium is offline
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I saw a bristle worm in my tank

I believe it was the bad kind. It had a feather like at the end of its mouth when it open to collect foods. What is the best way to get it out?

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Old 10-07-2006, 9:19 AM   #2
glxtrix glxtrix is offline
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there are bristle worm traps, but Ive never used them. I always did well with tweezers and nighttime with a flashlight. Good way to use a light at night, cover the lense with a red film, critters really cant process the red light.

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Old 10-07-2006, 10:28 AM   #3
tsciarini tsciarini is offline
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if youre going worm hunting it might not be a bad idea to put on some gloves too...

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Old 10-07-2006, 10:45 AM   #4
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yeah, I heard that some of these bristle worms pack some potent sting. Will Pseudochromis solve the bristle worm problem? If so, which of the Pseudochromis will do the best job?

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Old 10-07-2006, 10:51 AM   #5
tsciarini tsciarini is offline
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if you don't know what species worm it is, you really cant get very far. The vast majority of the worms in our tanks are harmless (not to say that there cant be a bad one, its just not as likely).
The first thing I would recommend is to get a valid ID the worm, then find a solution after that point.

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Old 10-07-2006, 10:59 AM   #6
gwen_o_lyn gwen_o_lyn is offline
 
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what color is it?

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Old 10-07-2006, 11:01 AM   #7
tsciarini tsciarini is offline
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having a picture would be best... or finding a picture of one on the net that youre absolutely sure is the same worm.

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Old 10-07-2006, 11:22 AM   #8
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Actually I got two types of bristle worm. One looks like the Hawaiian lined bristle worm and the second one a brown-greenish body with feathery like feeding plume extended from it's mouth when feeding.

Does anybody have any luck with some wrasses or arrow crabs to cotrolled the bristle worm population? I saw in a picture where the arrow crab is shown munching on a fireworm. Some said that the arrow crab will feeds on all types of bristle worms. Is this true?

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Old 10-07-2006, 11:24 AM   #9
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How do you attach pictures with a post? I tried before but I got an error message saying that the attach file is too large. Well I thought most of the pictures files are large to begin with. Am I doing something wrong with my attach files?

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Old 10-07-2006, 12:10 PM   #10
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here you go rit.
http://www.atlantareefclub.org/forum...ight=drag+drop

i just found a coral eating worm in my tank.the ones that grow to 20 feet. he ate up my large kenya tree.

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Old 10-09-2006, 3:38 PM   #11
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Someone at my local fish store said that a 6-lined wrasse would get rid of my bristle worms. He lied. I think that he just happens to move aoound the tank so much it keeps them at bay. At night they come out. and a couple of mine are big. So, if you get a wrasse to get rid of them don't try a 6-lined. I have seen several arrow crabs eating them at the Fish Store in Buckhead. I would just check on their compatability with other inverts, etc. Best of luck.

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Old 10-09-2006, 9:57 PM   #12
Schwaggs Schwaggs is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Platyplakia
Someone at my local fish store said that a 6-lined wrasse would get rid of my bristle worms. He lied.
I have no doubt that many wrasses will eat bristle worms if they are hungy enough and the worms small enough. I heard humans eat liver and onions... not me... but if I were hungry enough, I would!

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Old 10-10-2006, 4:37 AM   #13
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I heard humans eat liver and onions... not me... but if I were hungry enough, I would!
Ummmmm.....I would have to starve!

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Old 10-10-2006, 6:59 AM   #14
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Platy, seem like the crabs is the way to go but I'm very leary of them. They are scavengers. They may eat more things in my tank than I want them to.

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Old 10-10-2006, 8:32 AM   #15
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I had a six line wrasse that ate bristle worms. Unfortunately he committed suicide(left the top off). But then again I had a Lawnmower blenney that turned carniverous and quit eating algea and started eating my snails.

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Old 10-10-2006, 8:43 AM   #16
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Banded Coral Shrimp are also voracious eaters of bristleworms when they can find them. I've always maintained at least one in my tanks for just that reason.

They are teritorial, though, so if the tank is too small for everyone to have their own territory, it could end badly for one of them.

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Old 10-10-2006, 8:54 AM   #17
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Yes, banded coral shrimps are very territorial. I found that out the hard way. Bought 4 pairs and now just only have one pair left. I have 265 gallon tanks. I thought it would be large enough for more than a pair but it turn out not to be so.

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Old 10-10-2006, 9:59 AM   #18
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Two questions:

1) Are bristleworms harmful to reef stuff in the first place? I have a few in my tank but was never too concerned about it.

2) Would a banded coral shrimp kill a peppermint shrimp in a 30 gallon tank?

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Old 10-10-2006, 10:14 AM   #19
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Certain type of the bristle worm (the larger spicies) and the larger one will harm your reef tank. These guys will eat just about anything. Some said that they may even eat little fish. I never seen one doing it and don't want to find out.

Banded coral shrimp will eat the peppermint shrimp. They even will kill and eat the own kind. Banded coral shrimps are very territorial.

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Old 10-10-2006, 12:46 PM   #20
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I wouldn't say they definitely will kill another shrimp. It is true that you should only have one banded or a mated pair, but no more. I have seen extended detente between a like-sized banded and a skunk. Not sure about peppermint. They seem to be the "victims" of the invert world, IMO.

For bristleworms, my general rule is that if I see it somewhere besides in the sand (where the beneficial ones are), it's gotta go.

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