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Old 05-05-2012, 9:58 PM   #1
Allen Allen is offline
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Need a little help understanding lighting needs...

Hey, guys.

I am in the process of making a list of all the major components I am going to need to be successful with my 10 gallon setup.

Tank width is 20". I prefer to not have any hangover from a longer fixture.

I am looking at this one (20"):

http://www.marinedepot.com/AquaticLi...FIT54U-vi.html

It is saying that the total wattage is for that particular unit is 36w, but the bulbs say that they are 24w a piece. Doesn't add up? I was wanting at least 5w per gallon, as that is the formula I am using to distinguish what is "enough" wattage. I want to be able to grow all but "rare/hard to keep" corals, if that makes sense...

Also, it comes with one 420/460 bulb, and one 10,000k bulb. Does that mean one of the bulbs are attinic?

I am looking to spend around $100 on a light fixture. Do fixtures come with bulbs? The website doesn't specify if it comes with them.

I'm confident that I have an understanding on everything else but the lighting questions that I am asking about.

If anyone has another fixture in mind that they could recommend, please do so.

Thank you.

Allen

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Old 05-05-2012, 10:13 PM   #2
db366 db366 is offline
 
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There is no watts per gallon rule anymore. The 20" fixture uses 18 watt bulbs. The 24" fixture uses 24 watt bulbs. From what little reading I have done on smaller T5 fixtures people didn't like the 20" t5's because your bulb choices are limited. I'd suggest either saving up some and going with an LED fixture or buying a smaller metal halide fixture. Right now you can get some killer deals on MH fixtures, they used to run 2-3 hundred and you can find people just about giving them away. A 70 or 150 watt is more than enough for that size tank.

Most fixtures do come with bulbs, although the bulbs they come with stock are usually the cheapest thing they can find so they do need replaced by something better.

I have a Sunpod fixture with a 3 month old phoenix 14k bulb (one of the most popular bulbs out there), I thinking of selling. I'd take 90 for it. If you are interested.

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Old 05-05-2012, 10:19 PM   #3
Allen Allen is offline
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Why is the watts per gallon rule exempt? I've been doing tons of reading and watching videos on youtube and I hear the 3w/g will work, 5w/g is better, and 7w/g is best. Of course, that isn't factoring in PAR, but it's just way to get things going--So I've heard, anyway.

I have read the reviews on that fixture I linked, and most people are saying that their corals are doing better than ever or awesome with it.

I guess I could go with the 24" to ensure that I have a wide variety of bulbs available. Overhang is ugly to me, though. :(

What is the model number, or do you have a link to the fixture you may sell?

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Old 05-05-2012, 10:33 PM   #4
cbj25 cbj25 is offline
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In general you can stay with the w/g; the exception being with LEDs
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Old 05-05-2012, 10:38 PM   #5
Allen Allen is offline
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That's what I thought, because LEDs use very little wattage.

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Old 05-05-2012, 10:39 PM   #6
db366 db366 is offline
 
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WPG doesn't work because different lights are more effiencent than others. Like 2 75 watt incandesent bulbs does not compare to one 150 watt metal halide. Or 1 75 watt incandesent isn't as good as the 36 watts of t5ho. So you really can't go by wpg.

I am not saying the fixture you linked is bad, it's will grow corals just fine. When I was looking at getting a new light for my biocube when I had it I was reading about the 18" t5's the only bad comments were the lack of bulb choices that are availible at the longer lengths.
http://www.aquabuys.com/p/sunpod_20_150.html

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Old 05-05-2012, 11:33 PM   #7
Allen Allen is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by db366 View Post
WPG doesn't work because different lights are more effiencent than others. Like 2 75 watt incandesent bulbs does not compare to one 150 watt metal halide. Or 1 75 watt incandesent isn't as good as the 36 watts of t5ho. So you really can't go by wpg.

I am not saying the fixture you linked is bad, it's will grow corals just fine. When I was looking at getting a new light for my biocube when I had it I was reading about the 18" t5's the only bad comments were the lack of bulb choices that are availible at the longer lengths.
http://www.aquabuys.com/p/sunpod_20_150.html
Ahhh so many contradictions.

I'm saving up to get a new house right now, so It's going to be a couple of months before I buy a fixture. If you have it at that time, I will pick it up from you for sure.

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Old 05-06-2012, 8:21 AM   #8
eagle9252 eagle9252 is offline
 
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why a 10g??

the amount of water will be so small that the parameters could swing so fast. more water is better. can you squeeze a 20L or a 20H in the space? or you could stack them. how and what kind of filter system are you planning on running? I know your questions were about lights but that has been answered already. HTH

12-3/4"L x 20-1/4"W x 10"H, 10-gal.
12-1/2"L x 30-1/4"W x 13"H, 20-gal L.
12 1/2"L x 24-1/4"W x 16 3/4"H, 20-gal H.

go to a couple of LFS they have some small tanks as displays that I like and if I had a controlled area at work I would have but would use water from the larger tank for water changes I think.

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Old 05-07-2012, 8:56 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by eagle9252 View Post
why a 10g??

the amount of water will be so small that the parameters could swing so fast. more water is better. can you squeeze a 20L or a 20H in the space? or you could stack them. how and what kind of filter system are you planning on running? I know your questions were about lights but that has been answered already. HTH

12-3/4"L x 20-1/4"W x 10"H, 10-gal.
12-1/2"L x 30-1/4"W x 13"H, 20-gal L.
12 1/2"L x 24-1/4"W x 16 3/4"H, 20-gal H.

go to a couple of LFS they have some small tanks as displays that I like and if I had a controlled area at work I would have but would use water from the larger tank for water changes I think.
I'm going with a 10 gallon because that's what I was given by my grandmother. I'm aware that a smaller take is more difficult, but I'm up for the challenge. I like to do tons and tons of research on everything I plan on putting money into, so I'm sure I'll do fine. Gotta stay confident! My next tank will be something around 55 gallons, though.

As for filtration, my good friend just gave me an Eheim Professional II today. I have nice friends, eh?! He had an extra one. I know it's not designed to be used on such a small tank. I have watched videos on youtube and came across people using the Eheim Pro II on 10 gallon tanks. The flow rate is variable, so it should be fine. Another good thing about using the Eheim is that it is so big, it will add a little over a gallon and a half to my total water capacity--Helping with maintaining parameters.

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Old 05-07-2012, 9:20 PM   #10
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Just my opinion, but if you will be growing coral, your lighting is one of the most important parts of your set up.

You said you wanted to grow most types of coral except for the rare/hard to find types.. there are plenty of easy to find corals that won't grow under that light of yours.

It's better to look at corals by lighting needs, not by availability.

Softies and mushrooms generally don't need a lot of light
polyps/zoanthids generally thrive in any lighting scenario
LPS generally need more light than softies, but not as much as SPS
SPS generally require intense lighting

Seeing as you are using a 10 gallon tank which is pretty shallow, you should be able to grow most if not all of the corals I mentioned above as far as lighting conditions go. I have had plenty of success with all types of corals in a deeper tank than yours, so I can't imagine you having issues with your light.

Now, will you water parameters be up to snuff? don't know
Will you be limited in color versatility do to the bulb length? absolutely, then again, maybe you can find a color combination that you like

I would recommend trying to find a 24" tank around here - you can usually find them for dirt cheap. You will have more water to help forgive mistakes, and a 24" t5 light will be a lot better with color combinations

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Old 05-07-2012, 9:31 PM   #11
Allen Allen is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crew View Post
Just my opinion, but if you will be growing coral, your lighting is one of the most important parts of your set up.

You said you wanted to grow most types of coral except for the rare/hard to find types.. there are plenty of easy to find corals that won't grow under that light of yours.

It's better to look at corals by lighting needs, not by availability.

Softies and mushrooms generally don't need a lot of light
polyps/zoanthids generally thrive in any lighting scenario
LPS generally need more light than softies, but not as much as SPS
SPS generally require intense lighting

Seeing as you are using a 10 gallon tank which is pretty shallow, you should be able to grow most if not all of the corals I mentioned above as far as lighting conditions go. I have had plenty of success with all types of corals in a deeper tank than yours, so I can't imagine you having issues with your light.

Now, will you water parameters be up to snuff? don't know
Will you be limited in color versatility do to the bulb length? absolutely, then again, maybe you can find a color combination that you like

I would recommend trying to find a 24" tank around here - you can usually find them for dirt cheap. You will have more water to help forgive mistakes, and a 24" t5 light will be a lot better with color combinations
I said rare/hard to keep, not find. I meant rare as in, people don't grow them because they are difficult to keep.

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