View Full Version : DIY LED Lighting


anomaly
05-06-2010, 9:10 PM
Still working on it, but this is a decent start.

Here is a few photos, I'll try to edit it to fill in the details.

misu
05-06-2010, 9:29 PM
looking good with that cooler size you should not need any fans

consider painting some insulation once you're done, I got a bit zapped with a similar setup :)

jcusmarine
05-06-2010, 10:06 PM
Nice! Great to see some DIY goodness! I am really glad I moved to LED's and I think you will be pleased with your efforts once you have it setup. I was too lazy to build my own though....keep the pics/how-to's details coming!

anomaly
05-07-2010, 8:07 AM
looking good with that cooler size you should not need any fans

consider painting some insulation once you're done, I got a bit zapped with a similar setup :)


Go into more details. I don't currently see how I'm going to get zapped. Nothing on the DC side will zap be and the AC side is only coming into the meanwell.

I would like to do something to prevent saltcreep from damaging the soldered connections.

reefswimatl
05-07-2010, 9:00 AM
I design analyzers that are often placed in corrosive environments.
The easiest solution is "conformal coating".
It comes in a spray, or liquid.
You apply, it dries, and it is non-conductive.
The solder joints and exposed metal leads to the LED's are protected from moisture, salt, and corrosion.
I think Radio Shack used to sell it. Or you can order from standard places like McMaster Carr, Newark Electronics, or DigiKey (all online).
Hope this helps!
Tom

Fish Scales2
05-07-2010, 9:04 AM
Very nice!

anomaly
05-07-2010, 9:13 AM
I design analyzers that are often placed in corrosive environments.
The easiest solution is "conformal coating".
It comes in a spray, or liquid.
You apply, it dries, and it is non-conductive.
The solder joints and exposed metal leads to the LED's are protected from moisture, salt, and corrosion.
I think Radio Shack used to sell it. Or you can order from standard places like McMaster Carr, Newark Electronics, or DigiKey (all online).
Hope this helps!
Tom


Tom,

I'll look into that. Thanks.

misu
05-07-2010, 9:35 AM
can you get some cheaper than the $36/can I found on Amazon?



I design analyzers that are often placed in corrosive environments.
The easiest solution is "conformal coating".
It comes in a spray, or liquid.
You apply, it dries, and it is non-conductive.
The solder joints and exposed metal leads to the LED's are protected from moisture, salt, and corrosion.
I think Radio Shack used to sell it. Or you can order from standard places like McMaster Carr, Newark Electronics, or DigiKey (all online).
Hope this helps!
Tom

bpoulin
06-12-2010, 1:09 AM
Can you silicone the connections? I've done a lot of soldering, but never had to seal them like I would have to with this situation.

SnowManSnow
06-21-2010, 4:17 PM
looking good with that cooler size you should not need any fans

consider painting some insulation once you're done, I got a bit zapped with a similar setup :)

please put a fan on it :)

I just completed my build a few weeks ago, and you would be impressed with how quickly the sink gets pretty warm.

with this much invested in LED's there's no reason not to safe guard them with a fan IMO :)

Just a thought from someone who has been there, done that. :)

here's my build thread

http://www.atlantareefclub.org/forums/showthread.php?t=43366

kayakATL
08-10-2010, 2:02 PM
What materials did you use? What size tank are you using them on? Approx. material cost? I want to do a DIY LED myself, just trying to figure out what is out there and what people are having success with. Nice build! Cant wait to see more.

anomaly
08-10-2010, 11:09 PM
I failed terribly on creating a good tutorial, but here is a partial completion. I'm putting these on a 75 gallon until I get my 92 gallon going. Notice there are 6 drivers... only 3 are being used. Small dimmer on the breadboard allows 3-9.5 V adjustments for the drivers.

http://i690.photobucket.com/albums/vv266/AnomalyEE/Img_3497.jpg
http://i690.photobucket.com/albums/vv266/AnomalyEE/Img_3498.jpg

Materials were just alum. heat sinks, mean well drivers and some CREE LEDs.

They're quite easy to make, just a bit time consuming.

anomaly
08-10-2010, 11:10 PM
please put a fan on it :)

I just completed my build a few weeks ago, and you would be impressed with how quickly the sink gets pretty warm.

with this much invested in LED's there's no reason not to safe guard them with a fan IMO :)

Just a thought from someone who has been there, done that. :)

here's my build thread

http://www.atlantareefclub.org/forums/showthread.php?t=43366

I put 5 fans on the three heatsinks. You're right... they get warmer than you'd think even with a heatsink this size.

Aston Martin
08-11-2010, 7:49 AM
I design analyzers that are often placed in corrosive environments.
The easiest solution is "conformal coating".
It comes in a spray, or liquid.
You apply, it dries, and it is non-conductive.
The solder joints and exposed metal leads to the LED's are protected from moisture, salt, and corrosion.
I think Radio Shack used to sell it. Or you can order from standard places like McMaster Carr, Newark Electronics, or DigiKey (all online).
Hope this helps!
Tom


Should the connections be cleaned first, if so with what? Also how to keep it from getting on the LED lens?