View Full Version : Water Pressure question...


TAftonomos
12-24-2006, 11:18 PM
I just built a new house in McDonough GA. I aws told by the builder during the final walkthrough about GA requiring some type of water pressure reducer for new houses.

I can't remember what pressure he said the interior pipes are run to, nor was I thinking about my RO/DI system at the time either....first house jitter I guess.

Anyway, I'm doing some planning on the RO install, and I'm not sure if I'm going to need a pump or not. I suppose I could run a dedicated line from outside after the meter/before the restrictor just for my RO system (I've got to run a sprinkler system as well, so I'll be getting in the yard anyway) OR buy a booster pump.

Anyone know what the code is/pressure limit? What do I need for my RO to work decently (50psi ?)

THANKS! Merry Christmas btw :)

JustOneMoreTank
12-25-2006, 7:18 AM
Great question and situation. Sorry I dont know but I am also very curious. Hopefully some one will know. Do you have a pressure gauge? YOu could real quick hook up the RODI with the gauge on it and see what number you get. Then if it is necessary due to too low of a pressure you could run a dedicated line to feed the RODI.
I will be watching to see if anyone has more/better advice. :)

Vettesarebest
12-25-2006, 7:22 AM
It might be Cheaper to just go with the booster pump. But then again if your going to be digging up the yard anyways.

paul692
12-25-2006, 8:04 AM
you need a prv valve a pressure reducing valve on all county water hook ups.it limits pressure to about 50- 55 psi. it is adjustable.any more pressure than this and you could get what is called water hammer in your pipes . noisy vibrating pipesevery time you turn on a faucet.it could also cause your toilet to constantly fill and waste water threw the overflow pipe from to much pressureand not to forget the water heater from popping off excess pressure.need i say more.

TAftonomos
12-25-2006, 9:47 AM
you need a prv valve a pressure reducing valve on all county water hook ups.it limits pressure to about 50- 55 psi. it is adjustable.any more pressure than this and you could get what is called water hammer in your pipes . noisy vibrating pipesevery time you turn on a faucet.it could also cause your toilet to constantly fill and waste water threw the overflow pipe from to much pressureand not to forget the water heater from popping off excess pressure.need i say more.

50-55psi of pressure ought to be enough then, correct?

paul692
12-25-2006, 10:51 AM
yes my r/o unit works fine on that. your faucets are designed to work on that pressure.the r/o unit is plastic i would not want to subject it to higher than normal pressure for any length of time

TAftonomos
12-25-2006, 11:49 AM
Thanks Paul! I guess I could have just hooked it up and tried it, but I'm one of those planning types.

Merry Christmas!

Stanfill Reef
12-27-2006, 12:40 PM
Usually the pressure in a house is closer to 35-40 psi. The big issues being your water heater and dishwasher not being designed for higher pressures. ususally there is at least one outdoors hose bib on street pressure (tee-ed off before the pressure reducing valve(PRV)). At my house it is the front hose bib, so had a tee installed on that line in the house. I cut a hole in the garage to get access to that pipe, cut a tee, and installed a street pressure hose bib in my garage. I run my RO/DI from that faucet.

Now, your RO/DI will run at the lower pressure, but you will have more reject (waste) water per gallon of RO water made. How much depends on the incoming water quality, temperature, and pressure. Your RO/DI will flow much faster in the summer than the winter due to temperature opening up the pores (but the water quality will go down some too for the same reason).

I would not worry about using a pump, but if you can use street pressure then you will likely have a smaller water bill. Whatever you do, DO NOT adjust the PRV.

TAftonomos
12-27-2006, 12:50 PM
I think I'm going to mount the unit in the basement anyway, and just run the lines up to the tank(s) as needed. Since my basement is about 1 foot exposed in the front, it shouldn't be to hard to drill and run a line from the street side in. I've got to do a sprinkler system come spring time anyway, and I'll hide the solnoids for that under the porch, which is where I'd bring the line inside.

35-40 is what my pressure turned out to be, and I remember from being in a house and then an apartment before that 75-85psi of pressure sure made quite a difference in the RO production.